International Christian Recovery Coalition


+ Last updated:
 August 19, 2009

International Christian Recovery Coalition

A New Way Out

"We Christians in the Recovery Arena Are Not Alone"

 

 

The Dick B. Historical Treasures

(Displayed and Discussed at the James Club Meeting on May 14, 2009, in Norco, California; and Displayed throughout “A Nationwide Recovery Conference with Dick B.” on May 15-16, 2009, at Mariners Church Community Center in Irvine, California)

By Dick B.
© 2009 Anonymous. All rights reserved

1. A special reprint of Alcoholics Anonymous (the “Big Book”), 2d ed., by Ken R., having as its dust jacket a reproduction of one of the dust jackets originally considered for the First Edition of Alcoholics Anonymous. This proposed dust jacket includes the words “Their Pathway to a Cure” on the front of the dust jacket. It is important in showing that the early A.A. focus was on CURE.

2. Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers: A complete pre-publication manuscript by its author Niles Peebles (photocopies of all pages). Its value lies in the fact that it pre-dates the A.A. General Services Conference-approved publication, illustrates the changes that were later made, and identifies the early AAs by full name. This valuable document was acquired by me from the estate of Dennis Wayne Cassidy. (See "Confidential Memorandum" for fuller details.)

3. The personal journal of Dr. Bob’s wife, Anne Smith (photocopies of the pages). The Bible, Oxford Group, and later Big Book precepts fairly leap from its pages. The journal was written by Anne between 1933 and 1939, and shared with early AAs and their families. This includes the period of the summer of 1935 when Bill W. was: (a) staying at the Smith home; (b) working out the early A.A. program with Dr. Bob; and (c) hearing Anne Smith read to him and Dr. Bob frequently from this journal. The manuscript pages were provided to me at the request of Dr. Bob’s daughter Sue Smith Windows with the approval of the General Services Archives Committee, plus a copy of Anne Smith’s obituary. (See "Confidential Memorandum" for details.)

4. Lois Remembers: Numerous pre-publication versions of this autobiography of the wife of A.A. cofounder Bill Wilson (photocopies of the pages). These also illustrate the many changes that were made before the Lois Wilson memoirs were actually published. These also were acquired by me from the estate of Dennis Wayne Cassidy. (See "Confidential Memorandum" for fuller details.)

5. Dick B.’s review of the Clarence H. Snyder Bible and picture of it in the Ed Andy Library from which it came. The Bible itself was purchased by Ken R., sent to me for analysis and review, and is replete with important Bible references that Clarence studied and used. The Bible was given to A.A. old-timer Ed Andy who had it on display in his A.A. History Museum in Lorain, Ohio, for many years.

6. Our Legacy to the Faith Community: A Twelve-Step Guide for Those Who Want to Believe by Three Clarence H. Snyder Sponsees and Their Wives, compiled and edited by Dick B. This workbook was a year in preparation and underwent many changes as the sponsees wrote and compared their memories of precisely how Clarence Snyder took AAs through the Twelve Steps. Clarence was Dr. Bob's sponsee (sobriety date: February 1938), founded the first meeting of "Alcoholics Anonymous" in Cleveland in May 1939, and saw the Cleveland A.A. work grow from one to between 20 and 30 groups in one year. The workbook is now used in the many “Came to Believe” retreats in the United States and abroad. Retreat attendees are taken through the Steps in an afternoon. I compiled and edited the book and was privileged to add a good many historical comments.

7. An autographed photo of Bill W. and Father Dowling. This also was acquired by me from the estate of Dennis Wayne Cassidy.

8. A photo of the inscription by Bill Wilson dated 1/13/43 to Jesse Moren Bader (a prominent Christian leader) at the beginning of a First Edition Big book acquired by Ken R. Its significance lies in Bill’s closing phrase, “Yours in Christ, Bill Wilson.”

9. Dick B.’s personal collection of photocopies of pages from Sam Shoemaker's personal journal and of Bill Wilson letters. Dick B. and Ken B. were given complete access to a number of Sam Shoemaker's personal journals from key years of his involvement with the Oxford Group while he was rector of Calvary Church in New York just prior to A.A.'s coming into existence, and key years of his involvement with Bill Wilson and early A.A. We reviewed Sam's personal journals with Rev. Shoemaker’s daughter at her home in Florida. While Dick B. was doing research work at the Stepping Stones archives in New York, he was given access to a considerable amount of Bill Wilson's correspondence from the around the time of his white light experience and a number of years thereafter. Dick B. also donated copies of these documents to the Calvary Episcopal Church Shoemaker Room archives in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

10. Dick B.’s large personal collection of photocopies of the Bill Wilson Manuscripts that Dick acquired in his visits to Stepping Stones and of the Wilson-Dr. Carl Jung correspondence about Rowland Hazard. Dick B. also donated copies of these documents to the Griffith Library, Wilson House, East Dorset, Vermont.

11. Dick B.'s personal copies of the tremendously important titles by Richard K. of Massachusetts on early A.A. and the A.A. of today:

  • New Freedom: Reclaiming Alcoholics Anonymous--including (as Appendix I) his work titled "'A New Light': The First Forty - A Chronological Survey of the Early A.A. Pioneers (December 1934 - April 1939);
  • So Your Think Drunks Can't Be Cured?: Press Releases by Witnesses to the Cure; and
  • Early A.A. - Separating Fact from Fiction: How Revisionists Have Led Our History Astray.

Richard K. spent several months with me in Maui reviewing the rosters and materials I had as well as materials he obtained from A.A. General Services in New York. He carefully examined original documents and newspaper accounts and all the extant lists of the early A.A. members and their sobriety records. This is the most important study of early A.A. successes, cures, and announcements written to date.

12. Photocopies of the rosters of pioneer members. These were acquired by me from several A.A. historians such as Earl Husband, George Trotter, Sue Smith Windows, and Ray Grumney. Their value became particularly significant when other evidence was reviewed and disclosed that early AAs commonly kept address books, many containing names, addresses, phone numbers, sobriety information, and relapse and death notations. As a group, these rosters enable an accurate evaluation of the success records of "the First 40" pioneers surveyed by Bill and Bob as part of their "counting the noses of our recoveries" in November 1937. They also provide some of the evidence on which early A.A.'s claims of astonishing 75% and 93% success rates (overall, and in Cleveland, respectively) were based.

13. Photocopies of pages from Anne Smith’s address book, containing addresses of early AAs.

14. Copies and photos: Photos of the Mayflower Hotel in Akron where Bill first sought out a drunk to help; pictures of Dr. Walter Tunks and St. Paul’s Episcopal Church where Tunks was rector and to which Dr. Bob belonged; and copies of an original picture of Dr. Bob’s Home on Ardmore Street in Akron, Ohio, where “it all began.”

15. Photocopies of the two Frank Amos reports on the Original A.A. program. The first was acquired from the Rockefeller Archives in New York.  It specifically reports the elements of the original Akron A.A. Christian fellowship program, and it details Amos' thorough investigation of the early Akron program. The second Amos report was acquired by me from Stepping Stones Archives and shows the results of the five-hour dinner with the four Rockefeller men, Dr. William Silkworth, Dr. Leonard Strong (Wilson’s brother-in-law), John Henry Fitzhugh Mayo, several New Yorkers including Bill Wilson and Henry Parkhurst, and the two Akron members present—Dr. Bob and Paul Stanley. The conviction of all present was that the early AAs were “permanently cured.”

16. The four AA of Akron pamphlets commissioned by Dr. Bob and the Cleveland pamphlet on the Four Absolutes.

17. W.W. [Bill Wilson], "The Fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous" [lecture 29], in Alcohol, Science and Society: Twenty-nine Lectures with Discussions as Given at the Yale Summer School of Alcohol Studies (New Haven: Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1945). Bill W.'s lecture article is included in a large volume containing the lectures of the religious, medical, and scientific scholars who presented their views on alcoholism and its cure and then heard from Bill Wilson.

18. Books on St. Johnsbury Academy (which Dr. Bob attended from 1894 to 1898) and Burr and Burton Academy (which Bill W. attended from 1909 to 1913). Each book was obtained from the archivist at the academies attended by Dr. Bob and by Bill. Both describe the religious programs at the academies and contain pictures of the founders in their high school days.

19. Photographs of Dr. Bob’s boyhood home on Summer Street, St. Johnsbury, Vermont.

20. Photocopies of the series of Cleveland Plain Dealer articles (before they were altered by later hands) which report the cure of alcoholism

21. A photocopy of the article in The Tidings reporting the talks by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles in 1948. This article that demonstrated that both Bill and Bob were giving addresses on the same stage shortly before Dr. Bob died, when the wives of each were present, and some 4,500 attended. The mention of prayer, Divine Aid, the religious nature of the program, and the importance of Bible study are notable.

22. The Vermont Chronicle: Vol. LXXI, No. 24, June 11, 1896. Dick B. recently acquired this important issue of The Vermont Chronicle, “The Religious Family Paper of Vermont” This issue, printed in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, the home of Dr. Bob and his parents at the time, has a picture of the St. Johnsbury Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) building on its front cover. (This building was destroyed by fire in 1984 and then demolished.) The YMCA building was within easy walking distance from St. Johnsbury Academy where Bob Smith was attending at the time (1894-1898). Bob’s father, Judge Walter P. Smith, was president of the St. Johnsbury YMCA at the time (from at least 1895-1897). The issue reports on many of the topics Dick B. and Ken B. researched during their trips to Vermont in October 2007 and June 2008.  Topics include: (a) the training of youth; (b) sermons of churches; (c) Sunday school programs; (d) the continuing impact of the Great Awakening of 1875 in St. Johnsbury and its aftermath just before Bob was born; (e) the American Home Missionary Society in which Dr. Bob’s mother was so active; (f) the YMCA of St. Johnsbury, of which Dr. Bob’s father was president—including remarks by Judge Smith; and (g) the activities of Christian Endeavor Society which Dr. Bob specifically mentions as one of his youthful activities.

23. Photocopies of the original outline for Big Book content, plus the prospectus titled Alcoholics Anonymous which was written to promote the sale of stock to finance the Big Book.

24. Notes from the manager of the Wilson House on the records of Wilson family and Griffith family involvement in the East Dorset Congregational Church.

25. A photocopy of the Ruth Hock Historical Recollections written to Bill Wilson to explain how the Big Book was written and the many changes that were made in manuscripts including the changes pertaining to God.

26. Photocopies of extensive personal letters and memoranda sent to Dick B. by Dr. Bob’s daughter Sue Smith Windows and his son and daughter-in-law Bob and Betty Smith concerning the books owned by Dr. Bob and circulated among early A.A. members. These were based on my own later inspection of the books in Sue Windows’ attic, at Dr. Bob’s home where Bob Smith donated a portion of his books, and in the Bob and Betty Smith home in Nocona, Texas. Also on information gained from other literature and correspondence, all of which was incorporated into my two books, Dr. Bob and His Library, 3rd ed., and The Books Early AAs Read for Spiritual Growth, 7th ed.

27. Notes on the lives of T. Henry Williams and Clarace Williams, in whose home the original AAs met on Wednesdays for their old fashioned prayer meetings.

28. A photocopy of the letter by retiring A.A. board chairman, trustee, and senior Adviser Bob P. on the growing rigidity in A.A. involving censorship, attempts to “enforce” rules, etc.

29. Other historical finds!

 

We are looking for a person, a group, or an institution which will fund the acquisition of these treasures, help us assure that they will be properly stewarded and display, and enable the funds to be used in part to complete the Dr. Bob Core Library at North Congregational Church in St. Johnsbury, Vermont. For more information on the “Dick B. Historical Treasures” collection, please contact Dick B. by email at: dickb@dickb.com; by regular mail at: Dick B., PO Box 837, Kihei, HI 96753-0837; or by telephone at: (808) 874-4876.

 


"Confidential Memorandum" Relating to the "Dick B. Historical Treasures"
By Dick B. and Ken B.
PO Box 837, Kihei, HI 96753-0837; (808) 874-4876; dickb@dickb.com
© 2008-2009 Anonymous. All rights reserved

December 26, 2008; revised August 13, 2009

Item 1: Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers. A three-ring binder containing photocopies on 8 ½” x 11” sheets of paper of a complete, typewritten, pre-publication draft of Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers. The draft manuscript contains approximately 375 pages in acetate page protectors—in most cases, with two pages in each page protector and with the side of each page containing writing facing out. The black binder is approximately 12 inches long by 11 inches wide, with a spine width of approximately 4 ½ inches. (This binder looks almost identical to the binder

The pre-publication draft manuscript was acquired by Dick B. from the family of Dennis Wayne Cassidy, 257 Tremont Street, New Britain, CT. Other documents indicate that Dennis acquired the document from Barry Leach, possibly through their mutual friend Ron Sias.

The first page of the manuscript bears the following notations: (a) [in handwriting:] “by Niles Peebles July ‘78”; (b) [in capitalized letters, underlined:] “Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers”; (c) [at the bottom—in barely legible, printed handwriting—is the notation:] “Barry Leach’s copy     gift by . . . [barely legible] ) 11/24 . . .”

Page one of the document begins, “Robert Holbrook Smith.” It contains much of the material published at the beginning of the Alcoholics Anonymous General Service Conference-approved publication, DR. BOB and the Good Oldtimers. The very first page also contains inscribed corrections, including a correction of the name of Bob’s father from “Salter” to “Walter,” and a deletion of the name of Dr. Bob’s son, “Robert R. Smith.” Almost every subsequent page contains added letters, added quotation marks, added underlining, and deletions. Here are some examples: Page 13 asks in writing “?source”. On page 17 appears a question mark as to the spelling of the word “apocryphal”. On page 31, there is the question mark as to where Doctor Bob’s “training at Jefferson” took place with the notation “Philadelphia”. There are numerous grammatical, punctuation, and word corrections. There are questions about the usage on page 46 of comments about student nurses being at the lowest level with doctors being regarded as “demigods”. On page 71 appears the remark by Dr. Bob about his first meeting with Bill Wilson noting that Bill had been “cured” and adding that Bill threw in everything he ever knew or thought “or guessed” about alcohol. On page 92, there are suggested deletions of descriptions of Dr. Bob, of his comments concerning Bill D. On page 95, there is the description of Bill D. stating that “he had to get down on his knees at the side of the bed right there in the hospital and pray and say he would turn his life over to God”. Significantly, beginning at least on page 127, there are numerous descriptions of the early AAs such as Clarence Snyder, Warren Chisholm, J. D. Holmes, Joe Doeppler, Harold Grissinger, Paul Stanley, Dorothy Snyder, Bob Evans, Bill Jones, Ernie Gerig, Tom Lucas, Ernie Galbraith, Wally Gillam, Arch Trowbridge, and others. On pages 143-44, there are specific comments about the “bare majority of eighteen members” that voted to allow Bill to write the Big Book. There are several tales, including one about a pregnancy that took place between an alcoholic and a nursing student or aide, that apparently were deleted. On page 249, a comment by Sister Ignacia about prayer for “cure” was changed by handwritten amendment. Beginning at page 340, page numbers were changed indicating that substantial additional material was added to the draft. The renumbered pages end with 373.

This manuscript provides ample new information for study and comparison. For example, the manuscript lists the full names of many A.A. old-timers. Present-day scholars and students will thus be able actually to identify in this pre-publication draft of what became A.A. literature the very same persons who are named, with dates of sobriety, in extant rosters of early A.A. members. Those who study this pre-publication draft manuscript of Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers will also be able to observe and consider the significance of additions, deletions, and changes that were made before the official publication of the A.A. General Service Conference-approved book in 1980.

Item 2: Lois Remembers. Three “accordion-style” folders and one standard manila folder containing photocopies of multiple, pre-publication drafts on 8 ½” x 11” paper of chapters of Lois Wilson’s memoirs titled Lois Remembers.

“Accordion-style” folder # 1: white note tag on the outside which reads:

            “Chapters: Pgs. 394; 1 Thru 5; 6 Versions”

The versions for each chapter are grouped within their own respective manila folder. For example, in the manila folder for chapter one, there are six sets of pages (one set per version of chapter one) and each set of pages is paper-clipped together and has a small note under the paperclip giving the chapter and version information. For example, the paper-clipped notes attached to the versions of Chapter 1 read: : “Ch[ap] 1, Version 1”; “Ch. 1, Version 3”; “Ch 1, Version 4”; “Ch. 1, Version 5”; “Ch. 1, Version 6”; and “Ch. 1, Version 7”. There is a “B” in the upper left-hand corner of “Version 1” and of “Version 3.” Each version has a date on the upper left-hand side of (at least) the first page of the chapter, and each page has a page number on the upper right-hand side (e.g., I-1, I-2, and so forth).

            Chapter and version breakout in “accordion-style” folder # 1:

                        Chapter 1 = six (6) versions:               1, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7

                        Chapter 2 = three (3) versions:            1, 2, and 4

                        Chapter 3 = three (3) versions:            2, 3, and 4

                        Chapter 4 = six (6) versions:               1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6

                        Chapter 5 = three (3) versions:            1, 2, and 3

“Accordion-style” folder # 2: white note tag on the outside which reads:

            “Chapters: Pgs. 326; 6 Thru 14; 4 Versions”

The versions for each chapter are grouped within their own respective manila folder, and each set of pages is paper-clipped together and has a small note under the paperclip giving the chapter and version information. There is a “B” in the upper left-hand corner of at least some of the versions. Each version has a date on the upper left-hand side (typed; or handwritten on the upper right-hand side) of (at least) the first page of the chapter, and each page has a page number on the upper right-hand side.

            Chapter and version breakout in “accordion-style” folder # 2:

                        Chapter 6 = two (2) versions:             1 and 2

                        Chapter 7 = three (3) versions:            1, 2, and 3

                        Chapter 8 = four (4) versions:             1, 2, 3, and 4

                        Chapter 9 = two (2) versions:             1 and 2

                        Chapter 10 = three (3) versions:          1, 2, and 3

                        Chapter 11 = four (4) versions:           1, 2, 3, and 4

                        Chapter 12 = three (3) versions:          1, 2, and 3

                        Chapter 13 = four (4) versions:           1, 2, 3, and 4

                        Chapter 14 = three (3) versions:          1, 2, and 3

“Accordion-style” folder # 3: white note tag on the outside which reads:

            “Chapters: Pgs. 270; 15 Thru 19; Versions 6”

The versions for each chapter are grouped within their own respective manila folder, and each set of pages is paper-clipped together and has a small note under the paperclip giving the chapter and version information. There is a “B” in the upper left-hand corner of at least some of the versions. Each version has a date on the upper left-hand side (typed; or handwritten on the upper right-hand side) of (at least) the first page of the chapter, and each page has a page number on the upper right-hand side.

            Chapter and version breakout in “accordion-style” folder # 3:

                        Chapter 15 = four (4) versions:           1, 2, 3, and 4

                        Chapter 16 = five (5) versions:           1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 **

                        Chapter 17 = six (6) versions:             1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 ****

** Chapter 16, Versions 2, 3, and 4 say on the paper-clipped note: “Ch. 16 (marked 15)”

**** Chapter 17, Versions 2, 3, 4, and 5 say on the paper-clipped note: “Ch. 17 (marked 16)”

Manila folder contents:

Chapter VIII: Dated 10/17/78; 5 pp., with a “B” in the upper left corner and numbered VIII-1, VIII-3, VIII-4, VIII-7, and VIII-8.


A note: “4th Version; Chapter VIII; 12 pages (typed); Lois Remembers; 10/16/78” (on a piece of paper smaller than 8 ½” x 11”).


Chapter VIII: the 12 types pages, dated 10/16/78, and numbered VIII-1 through VIII-12 to which the preceding note referred.


A note: “1st Version; Chapter VII; 14 pages; (Blocked); ‘Lois Remembers’; Final Title; ‘Ebby and the Mountain Top’; Dated 10/21 or 12/7/77; Editor Barry Leach; Note: Title this version is ‘Bill’s Drinking’” (on a piece of paper smaller than 8 ½” x 11”).

A note (on a piece of paper smaller than 8 ½” x 11”):

            Chapter 7

Version            Date                                        Pages               Print

            1                      10/21 or 12/7                           14                    Block

            2                      10/16                                       20                    Typed

            3                      12/19, 2/21/ & 1/19                 21                    Block

            Chapter 8

            1                      10/17 or none                          8                      Block

            2                      10/20, 10/27, 10/21, 10/27      13                    Block

            3                      2/21, 1/20, 2/21                       12                    Block

            4                      10/16                                       12                    Typed


Chapter VII: the 14 typed pages to which the preceding note referred, handwritten “Barry” in upper left of 1st page, typed date 10/1/77 on 1st page, handwritten dates of 10/21/77 (crossed out) and 12/7/77 (not crossed out) on all 14 pages; and numbered VI-1 through VI-14 (typewritten, crossed out by hand, and renumbered by hand as VII-1, etc.).


A note: “3rd Version; Chapter VIII; 12 pages (Blocked); Lois Remembers; 2/21/78; 1/20/78; 2/21/78” (on a piece of paper smaller than 8 ½” x 11”).


Chapter VIII: the 12 typed pages to which the preceding note referred, [may have remnant of handwritten “Barry” in upper left of pages], typed date of 2/21/78 on 1st page, numbered VIII-1 through VIII-12 (typewritten).

These items probably have the same provenance as the Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers manuscript because they appear very much the same, contain the same kind of revision, and have notations which refer to Barry Leach to whom the manuscript was given. These multiple pre-publication versions of chapters from Lois Remembers offer the same opportunity for scholarly study and comparison as does the reproduction of the pre-publication draft of Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers discussed above.

Item 3: Anne Smith’s personal journal. A reproduction of Anne Smith’s personal journal in my own binder with acetate page protectors and a copy of my last note to Dr. Bob’s daughter on February 7, 2001.

The original papers were acquired by me from Alcoholics Anonymous General Services. Sue Smith Windows (Dr. Bob’s daughter) wrote them a letter, a copy of which I can provide; and A.A. General Service’s archivist, Frank Mauser, secured the approval for transmission to me of the 64 pages they had. Sue Windows always claimed that these papers, of which both she and her brother Smitty received copies, were incomplete. She wrote in her autobiography, Children of the Healer, that Bill and Lois Wilson had picked up the originals at the time of Dr. Bob’s funeral and that they had never been returned. About 10 years after I acquired the manuscript pages from G.S.O., I acquired additional pages, some of which were new and contained matter not in the original group. I telephoned Sue Windows and told her I believed that I had found some of the missing papers and sent them to her, but I never received further comments from her.

In addition, I found a copy of these manuscript papers in a binder at Stepping Stones when I conducted my research there. The binder stated in two different types of handwriting on the outside the following: (1) “W. G. Wilson—Brooklyn Law School;” (2) “Anne Smiths Oxford Group Notes sent to G.S.O. for zeroxing [sic]. Originals then sent to Sue Galbraith Aug. 1974”. My binder contains a copy of my note to Sue in 2001, a copy of the cover page from Stepping Stones, the manuscript papers received from G.S.O., and the additional papers I found among the personal papers of Clarence Snyder at the home of Danny Whitmore in Southern California.

I wrote, published, and later revised my book, Anne Smith’s Journal, 1933-1939: A.A.’s Principles of Success. It contains a thorough statement of the key remarks and points in Anne Smith’s personal journal, interpreted in terms of my extensive research of A.A. roots in the Bible, the Oxford Group, the teachings of Sam Shoemaker, the library of Dr. Bob, the Akron beginnings of A.A., and Quiet Time. All of the pages constitute tough sledding for anyone who attempts to describe them or publish them. This is for the reason that some of the pages were typed for Anne by her daughter Sue when Sue was in business school. Some are simply in Anne’s own handwriting. Some contain extensive handwritten annotations by Anne.

The value of Anne Smith’s work lies in the fact that it was written by Anne between 1933 and 1939, and discusses all the major biblical, Oxford Group, Christian, and practical guides that she was sharing with AAs and their families at the morning Quiet Times in the Smith home. Upon reading this document, one is immediately struck by the applicability of Anne’s comments to an understanding, not only of A.A.’s roots, but also of such much-described A.A. principles as love, use of the Bible, surrender, Quiet Time, sharing, overcoming sins, moral standards, restitution, and groups.


Contact:
International Christian Recovery Coalition
c/o Dick B.
P.O. Box 837
Kihei, Hawaii
96753-0837
Ph/fax: (808) 874-4876
Email: dickb@dickb.com

 

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